North American Business Conditions Improve for Second Consecutive Month in November
Dec 12, 2011
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The economic environment facing the North American electroindustry improved for a second straight month in November, according to NEMA's Electroindustry Business Confidence Index (EBCI).

North America:
• conditions now (compared to previous month): 56.6
• conditions 6 months from now (compared to current conditions): 60.0

Latin America:
• conditions now (compared to previous month): 50.0
• conditions 6 months from now (compared to current conditions): 68.4

Europe:
• conditions now (compared to previous month): 27.8
• conditions 6 months from now (compared to current conditions): 28.9

Asia/Pacific:
• conditions now (compared to previous month): 36.1
• conditions 6 months from now (compared to current conditions): 60.5

The EBCI categorizes North America as Canada and the United States. Latin America includes Mexico, Central America, and South America.

North American – Current Conditions
North American conditions stood at an EBCI Index level of 56 in November, down from 57.4 in October 2011. NEMA noted the measure was above 50, meaning more panelists see an improvement in the business environment than those who do not. The November report showed:
• 20% of survey panelists reported that the current month's conditions were improved from the previous month's
• 8% reported that the current month's conditions had deteriorated from the previous month's
• 72% saw no change in conditions

In October:
• 30% of panelists reported improved conditions
• 15% of panelists reported conditions declined

North American – Future Conditions
While November’s EBCI for future North American conditions eased to 60 from 63 a month ago, the gauge of expectation six month hence continued to point in a positive direction.

• 32% of panelists expect conditions to improve to at least some degree in the next six months
• 12% anticipate conditions will worsen

In October:
• 41% of panelists expected an improvement
• 15% expected a decline

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